Author Topic: Chevrolet Nova  (Read 8011 times)

Gremlin

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Chevrolet Nova
« on: March 16, 2011, 08:06:49 PM »

This is a thread about the NUMMI Nova made in San Jose, California for the 1985 to 1988 model years. It was replaced by the Geo Prizm. The 80s Nova had the best build quality of any 80s GM car since it was badge engineered Toyota Corolla  :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2011, 08:11:41 PM »
I really need to make rules about this forum.

Gremlin

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2011, 08:18:19 PM »
I really need to make rules about this forum.
Well, Duh. :P

However, wait until somebody makes a post about the 1984 Ford Tempo

Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2011, 08:35:17 PM »
Well, Duh. :P

However, wait until somebody makes a post about the 1984 Ford Tempo

Silly me thinking that the description would say it all.  Factory classics and good looking modern day cars.  Of which the Nova pictured above is neither.

speedy_2

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2011, 08:38:54 PM »
There's only one problem with that.

What decides which cars are "good looking" and "classic?"   

FoMoGo

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2011, 08:43:36 PM »
BINGO!!!
I could argue, and be 100% truthful, that the 1983 Thunderbird would be a good car for this forum.
Designed with a shape for the super speedway, fords first EFI turbocharged engine, also intended to compete with the BMW 5 series.
However, in general, they are seen as a boring 2 door car for more mature people.
Or expand it to the 83-88 thunderbirds... which still hold the speed record in NASCAR.
HUGE gray area here.


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Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2011, 09:00:34 PM »
There's only one problem with that.

What decides which cars are "good looking" and "classic?"   

Classic is defined by time.  Not really a whole lot you can do about that.  If it's classic it's classic.  The nova isn't that great looking, the Nova changed nothing about it's segment, and was basically a humdrum car.

What pisses me off is how people take something and twist the intentions of it just for their own shits and giggles.

Grim91Z

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2011, 04:53:56 AM »
Time as in before a certain year? Or time as in at least X amount of years old? There are a number of cars from the 80s and 90s that are becoming or gonna become classics to someone because of their automotive achievements or the value they hold.

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dotCom

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2011, 07:09:44 AM »
I assumed that classic meant more along the lines of vehicles that pioneered the way for others; or figureheads in production - did you know the old ass Acura TLs had all sorts of features some newer cars still don't have, for instance?


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Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2011, 07:22:25 AM »
Time as in before a certain year? Or time as in at least X amount of years old? There are a number of cars from the 80s and 90s that are becoming or gonna become classics to someone because of their automotive achievements or the value they hold.



Did you see the 80's taurus posted in this forum? ;)

Grim91Z

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2011, 02:15:04 PM »
Did you see the 80's taurus posted in this forum? ;)
Yes but you didn't post it. :P Now that we have a clear understanding, let's carry on.
Formerly DoD.

MiniVanMan

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2011, 02:49:58 PM »
I assumed that classic meant more along the lines of vehicles that pioneered the way for others; or figureheads in production - did you know the old ass Acura TLs had all sorts of features some newer cars still don't have, for instance?

Classic really is sort of a broad term. Most commonly accepted definition would be a car that made an impact in the automotive world, but others will say a classic could simply be a popular car of its day, or even a vaguely unique car.

If we're going by cars that impacted the auto industry, guess what?



If we're going by cars that were simply just popular cars during its day, guess what?



Or vaguely unique, guess...



...yeah, fuck that noise.

I think classic would be better designed as "cars that bring back fond memories", or, cars that when you look at them, you simply stop and stare.

Like these.






Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2011, 05:55:01 PM »
Yes but you didn't post it. :P Now that we have a clear understanding, let's carry on.

Yes I did.

jeepinator

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2011, 03:50:28 PM »
Yes but you didn't post it. :P
Yes I did.

Subject: The Ford Taurus
Started By: Jeepidude

No, you didn't.

Grim91Z

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2011, 04:09:43 PM »
Unless that's his alter ego...
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jeepidude

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2011, 04:55:24 PM »
Unless that's his alter ego...



 :lol:


no.

Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2011, 09:08:45 PM »
Subject: The Ford Taurus
Started By: Jeepidude

No, you didn't.
Unless that's his alter ego...

My bad, I thought he said post in it.  Misread it.

Having said that, had you read the thread and saw my response, you might have understood what I was trying to do with this forum ;)

Mick

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2011, 10:31:06 PM »
I am not sure and doubt it, but this could be considered. Is this the first cross venture vehicle between different big companies. i know a lot came after it corolla/prism, Metro/Swift, etc.

Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2011, 10:49:16 PM »
I am not sure and doubt it, but this could be considered. Is this the first cross venture vehicle between different big companies. i know a lot came after it corolla/prism, Metro/Swift, etc.

That's a good point.

MiniVanMan

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2011, 12:21:41 PM »
I am not sure and doubt it, but this could be considered. Is this the first cross venture vehicle between different big companies. i know a lot came after it corolla/prism, Metro/Swift, etc.

Pontiac Vibe/Toyota Matrix... This is a good point.

Onyx Dragon

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2011, 01:02:46 PM »
Pontiac Vibe/Toyota Matrix... This is a good point.

Especially since they've done this, what, 5 times since the Nova?

Mick

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #21 on: March 21, 2011, 02:28:33 PM »
Pontiac Vibe/Toyota Matrix... This is a good point.

Don't forget the toyota cavalier.

Aeroboost

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Re: Chevrolet Nova
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2011, 12:15:18 PM »

This is a thread about the NUMMI Nova made in San Jose, California for the 1985 to 1988 model years. It was replaced by the Geo Prizm. The 80s Nova had the best build quality of any 80s GM car since it was badge engineered Toyota Corolla  :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
There's a very interesting story behind the NUMMI plant from the time period these cars were built.  Joint venture between GM and Toyota.  GM wishing to revamp its factories suffering from every problem imaginable and Toyota wanting to learn about the american work force before efforts to assemble their cars here.  
GM learned nothing (due to managers and such not playing along) until it was over and basically too late.

made me look at those little novas in a completely different way.

this is an awesome listen, if you have the time:
radio show all about it, runs just over an hour.
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ORIGINALLY AIRED 03.26.2010

A car plant in Fremont California that might have saved the U.S. car industry. In 1984, General Motors and Toyota opened NUMMI as a joint venture. Toyota showed GM the secrets of its production system: How it made cars of much higher quality and much lower cost than GM achieved. Frank Langfitt explains why GM didn't learn the lessons—until it was too late.
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/403/nummi

Prologue.

Host Ira Glass introduces the story of the New United Motor Manufacturing Inc., aka NUMMI. In 1984, General Motors and Toyota opened NUMMI as a joint venture. Toyota showed GM the secrets of its production system: How it made cars of much higher quality and much lower cost than GM achieved. But today, GM cars still don't have the quality of Japanese imports, GM is bankrupt and on March 31, NUMMI will be closed, sending thousands of car workers looking for jobs. In this hour-long story, NPR Automotive Correspondent Frank Langfitt tells the story of NUMMI and why GM—and the rest of the American car business—wasn't able to learn from it more quickly. (4 minutes)

Act One.

The rise of NUMMI, or how one of the worst auto plants in America started producing some of its best cars, thanks to lessons learned from the Toyota production system. (25 minutes)

Act Two.

Why did it take so many years for GM to begin implementing the lessons of NUMMI across the company? NPR Automotive Correspondent Frank Langfitt continues his story. (26 minutes)
This episode contains interviews with the following individuals: David Champion, Jeffrey Liker, John Shook, Bruce Lee and Joel Smith of United Auto Workers / UAW, Rick Madrid, Billy Haggerty, Richard Aguilar, Earl Ferguson, Ernie Schaefer, Mark Hogan, Steve Bera, Larry Spiegel, Dick Fuller, Geoff Weller and James Womack.
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/403/nummi


And I rather like the direction this forum seems to have taken\
it's like watching the History/Discovery Channel  :D
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 01:11:16 PM by Aeroboost »
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